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How to change the light bulb
After 100 years, the world of light bulbs is undergoing a rapid transformation from incandescent to halogen, compact flourescent, and LED.

How many engineers does it take to change a light bulb?  Five. But it took an act of Congress to make it practical.  In this week’s Exploradio we meet a small group of engineers at GE’s East Cleveland lighting headquarters who are changing the light bulb as we know it.
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The march of the bat killer
A quiet killer is stalking bats in Ohio.  Biologists are in a race against time in the fight against white nose syndrome.

Wildlife biologists in Ohio are poking around caves and abandoned mines this month to count hibernating bats.  A recent national bat conference detailed the spread of a killer disease wiping out bats in the Northeast saying nearly 7 million animals have died from white nose syndrome.  In this week’s Exporadio we speak with Ann Froschauer from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.  She’s on the front-lines of the battle for the bats.
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The other side of evolution
Darwin's theory says mutations drive evolution.  The new science of epigenetics describes other mechanisms for change that don't involve DNA.

Darwin expounded on natural selection as the basis of evolution back in the 1850’s.  One hundred years later, Watson and Crick introduced the DNA molecule, and a mechanism for evolutionary change. Another 50 years, and the Human Genome Project sequenced human DNA with its 25,000 genes. Now a new chapter is opeing in our understanding of how we get to be who we are. It’s called epigenetics. In this week’s Exploradio, we look at how epigenetics is providing insight into cancer research in Cleveland.
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A new age for whiskey
A Cleveland entrepreneur enters the tradition-bound industry with a new process that ages whiskey in weeks rather than years

Every now and then an innovation comes along that dramatically changes an industry.  Tom Lix thinks he has such an innovation for the whiskey industry. He’s a Boston transplant who’s using a new process that could put Cleveland on the map as whiskey producer. In this week’s Exploradio: A new age for whiskey.
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Obesity and memory
New research shows that weight loss can improve brain function -  but the opposite is also true, weight gain leads to memory loss.

The holidays are hard on just about everyone’s waistline. But that’s what New Year’s resolutions are for. A new body of research, though, is showing that for seriously obese people, keeping those New Year’s resolutions can actually improve brain function. In this week’s Exploradio, we look at the link between weight loss and memory gain.
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The sea cucumber and the brain
Science sometimes moves in mysterious ways - for example, a lesson learned from the sea cucumber may someday help spinal cord patients.

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University are developing a better way to communicate with the human brain by studying how a simple sea creature defends itself. In this week’s Exploradio, how chemistry borrowed from the lowly sea cucumber allows bioengineers to build a better brain probe.
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The Kinect connection
Researchers at the University of Akron are out to prove that a picture may be worth a thousand words in modern education.

Some educators believe analog education -  think chalk boards and lectures -  is failing to reach a generation of kids raised on high-tech video games and virtual worlds. In this week’s Exploradio, we meet a team of researchers at the University of Akron who believe a 3-D gaming consul can help bridge education’s digital divide.
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The papyrus window
Kent State students are among a handful of undergrads nationwide given access to ancient papyrus texts from Egypt

The discovery of a huge stash of papyrus scrolls in the Egyptian desert 100 years ago is gradually adding to our understanding of life in ancient times.  But it’s taken scholars decades to translate the thousands of fragile papyrus texts. For the first time, a small number of undergraduate students have been enlisted to study the rare finds. In this week’s Exploradio we decipher the papyrus of Oxyrynchus.
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The art of the skull menders
A small start-up in Cleveland uses cutting edge technology and an artist's eye to create custom implants for brain surgery patients

This spring, congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords underwent surgery in which doctors patched her bullet-damaged skull with a custom-made piece of plastic.  In this week’s Exploradio we visit a Cleveland start-up that creates skull implants like the one doctors used for Giffords.  It’s equal parts high-tech science and hands-on artistry.
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Graftech out of the ashes
Caught up in a global carbon cartel in the 1990's Cleveland's Graftech reinvents itself; celebrates 125 years by innovating new uses for a humble material

A company born 125 years ago in Cleveland’s industrial heyday continues to thrive despite declines in heavy industry.  In this week’s Exploradio we look at how the maker of the most humble of materials survived graft and the global downturn by stressing innovation.
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Monkshood patrol
One of America's rarest wild-flowers is clinging to life in Cuyahoga Falls and it takes constant vigilance to keep it safe

A sheltered cliff along the Cuyahoga River is home to one of the last patches of a critically threatened wild-flower.  In this week’s Exploradio we meet the man whose job is to keep critters and people away from the endangered northern monkshood.
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The whirring heart
The Cleveland Clinic's Innovation Summit looks at the business of heart care, but the keynote speaker will share his experiences as the nation's most famous heart patient.

For people with severe heart disease, a small motor implanted in the chest can take over for a heart that’s ready to give out.  It’s a 20 year-old technology that’s suddenly gaining attention thanks to one very famous patient. In this week’s Exploradio, we look at a life without a pulse.
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The Rx for hospital design
Experience Design is a new field that looks at the emotional impact of an architectual space.  It's used in retail, at Disney theme parks, and now, in hospitals.

The developers of theme parks, high-end retail, and Las Vegas casinos all know something about creating the right ‘experience’.  Now an area hospital is applying lessons from the field of ‘experience design’ to help enhance the patient experience. In this week’s Exploradio, we meet a former multi-media artist researching  what goes into the ideal hospital stay.
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The liquid crystal kingdom
The future is now at Kent State's Liquid Crystal Institute, the world's foremost lab dedicated to research in this mysterious state of matter.

Look around and you’re likely to encounter liquid crystal technology -  your computer screen, alarm clock, cell phone, calculator -- even  the parking meter.  What was once an obscure branch of chemistry is now indispensible technology, and the world center for liquid crystal research is at Kent State University. In this week’s Exploradio, we meet the new head of the program, and learn what’s next at the Liquid Crystal Institute.
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Wooster's solar record
The College of Wooster installs the largest solar array of any school in the country without spending any cash

The College of Wooster flipped the switch last month on the largest solar array for any college or university in the country.  They didn’t plan it that way, and they didn’t pay anything for it. In this week’s Exploradio, going off the grid, bigtime.
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The natural origins of music
The sounds and rhthyms of nature help a Cleveland composer make the most of summer's passing glory

From the Exploradio archives, as the waning days of warm weather give way to autumn's embrace: It’s late August, and summer is winding down.  Song birds will soon head south, and the frost will silence the nightly chorus of crickets, katydids, and singing insects.  In this week’s Exploradio, a Cleveland composer shares her exploration of the natural origins of music in tribute to the sounds of the fading season.
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