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NASA powers Cleveland's clean bus
Hydrogen can send a space shuttle into orbit, and power a bus around Cleveland in a new partnership between RTA and NASA Glenn.

Hydrogen is the fuel NASA used to put people in space aboard the shuttle.  Now NASA Glenn plans to use it to move people around on the ground in Cleveland.  The plan is to install a hydrogen fueling station at the RTA garage in East Cleveland that will power a fuel cell bus.  Some people are worried about the safety of storing hydrogen at the facility.  In this week’s Exploradio  -  We discuss hydrogen fuel cells with Valerie Lyons, head of the in-space propulsion unit at NASA Glenn.
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A tour of maker culture
'Makers' are part of a new movement that combines high-tech with hands-on, as people rediscover the joys of making things.

Desktop publishing revolutionized the world of printing in the 1980’s. In the 90’s, digital recording changed the way music is made. Now, 3-D printers are making desktop manufacturing a reality.

In this week’s Exploradio, we take a tour of maker culture in Northeast Ohio.  It’s a movement that combines high tech with old fashioned do-it-yourself creativity.
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The battery's new brain
A young entreprenuer in Akron is building a better way to control the flow of power in and out of clean energy batteries

The batteries that store power in electric cars, electric lift trucks, or solar arrays can be … finicky.  Without proper care, batteries can drain rather than store power - they can fail, or even catch fire. In this week’s Exploradio, we meet a young entrepreneur whose product teaches batteries to behave.
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Where does it hurt?
A veteran nurse discovers that her experience as a mother of an autistic child helps her care for children unable to speak because of surgery

Scientific research is a process of discovery and refinement, and for a nurse at Akron Children’s Hospital, research reveals a better way to care for children in pain.    In this week’s Exploradio -  we meet a veteran nurse turned researcher who uses pictures when words fail.
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Back to dust to dust
The Wilderness Center operates the country's only nature preserve/cemetery. It combines habitat restoration with a final resting place for nature lovers

Innovation can sometimes mean taking away, rather than adding, technology.  One example is the growing trend of natural burial.  It’s a return to the practices of previous generations  -  no chemicals, metal caskets, or concrete vaults.  In this week’s Exploradio we visit a nature preserve in rural Ohio that’s funded by final wishes.
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Heart disease and our inner ecology
New research at the Cleveland Clinic shows for the first time that what happens in our gut determines a healthy or diseased heart

Cholesterol remains the leading indicator of heart disease. But a study by the Cleveland Clinic is putting the spotlight on a different cause of the killer. And for the first time, the research shows that what happens in your gut plays a leading role in what happens to your heart . In this week’s Exploradio - the link between heart disease and our inner ecology.
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Our cousin in the trees
A fossil foot discovered in Ethiopia shows that nature experimented with more than one manner of upright walking on the path to humankind.

The human family tree just got a little bushier. Cleveland researchers say fossil foot bones recently discovered in Ethiopia belong to a distant cousin of humankind.  But, while the foot’s original owner lived in trees, they say our direct ancestors walked a different evolutionary pathway. In this week’s Exploradio:  A fossil foot and the origin of the human family.
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Hope for Alzheimer's
It effects virtually everyone, either through a loved one, a friend, or our older selves.  Alzheimer's is the biggest area of unmet need in medicine, and the focus of intense research in Cleveland.

Right now, hundreds of clinical trials are underway testing every potential treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.  Few, if any, will be successful.  Still, researchers at Case Western Reserve University are hopeful that, despite a field littered with failed attempts, their approach will combat the incurable disease. In this week’s Exploradio, we meet a team on the frontlines in the fight against Alzheimer’s.
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Quantum philosophy
The rules governing the universe become increasingly mysterious the smaller you look.  Quantum theory holds some, but not all the answers.

There’s more to matter than the protons and electrons we learned in high school.  Scientists have discovered a whole menagerie of subatomic particles that behave in mysterious ways, following their own set of rules called quantum mechanics.  In this week’s Exploradio we dive into the deep world of the very small with Kent State University physics professor Peter Tandy.
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A start-up's steep climb
The rocky road from lab bench to factory floor is littered with could-have-beens, but that's not stopping one Akron start-up

New products usually have three phases on the way to commercial use. First is discovery, then the steep learning curve to pilot production, and finally the jump to full-scale production.

In this week’s Exploradio, we look at some of the challenges of taking an idea from the lab bench to the factory floor.
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Orchid obsessions
No other plant has captured the human imagination like the orchid.  People have created a quarter-million varieties, but the hunger for more is insatiable.

They’re the most diverse group of flowers on earth, and among the  most popular -  more orchids are sold in the U.S. than any potted plant. But for a certain few, orchids are more than a hobby, they’re an obsession.  And as with any obsession, there are risks.  In this week’s Exploradio -   the art, science, and maddening allure of orchids.
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Outwitting ice
A technology invented to prevent icing on airplanes is being adapted to the international wind industry

A small Northeast Ohio company is a world leader in developing a deicing technology for wind turbines.  But it didn’t happen overnight. In this week’s Exploradio, we look at how innovation is equal parts dogged determination and just winging it.
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How to change the light bulb
After 100 years, the world of light bulbs is undergoing a rapid transformation from incandescent to halogen, compact flourescent, and LED.

How many engineers does it take to change a light bulb?  Five. But it took an act of Congress to make it practical.  In this week’s Exploradio we meet a small group of engineers at GE’s East Cleveland lighting headquarters who are changing the light bulb as we know it.
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The march of the bat killer
A quiet killer is stalking bats in Ohio.  Biologists are in a race against time in the fight against white nose syndrome.

Wildlife biologists in Ohio are poking around caves and abandoned mines this month to count hibernating bats.  A recent national bat conference detailed the spread of a killer disease wiping out bats in the Northeast saying nearly 7 million animals have died from white nose syndrome.  In this week’s Exporadio we speak with Ann Froschauer from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.  She’s on the front-lines of the battle for the bats.
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The other side of evolution
Darwin's theory says mutations drive evolution.  The new science of epigenetics describes other mechanisms for change that don't involve DNA.

Darwin expounded on natural selection as the basis of evolution back in the 1850’s.  One hundred years later, Watson and Crick introduced the DNA molecule, and a mechanism for evolutionary change. Another 50 years, and the Human Genome Project sequenced human DNA with its 25,000 genes. Now a new chapter is opeing in our understanding of how we get to be who we are. It’s called epigenetics. In this week’s Exploradio, we look at how epigenetics is providing insight into cancer research in Cleveland.
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A new age for whiskey
A Cleveland entrepreneur enters the tradition-bound industry with a new process that ages whiskey in weeks rather than years

Every now and then an innovation comes along that dramatically changes an industry.  Tom Lix thinks he has such an innovation for the whiskey industry. He’s a Boston transplant who’s using a new process that could put Cleveland on the map as whiskey producer. In this week’s Exploradio: A new age for whiskey.
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