News
News Home
Quick Bites
Exploradio
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
NPR
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

NOCHE

Don Drumm Studios

Akron Children's Hospital


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us
Health and Medicine




Exploradio: MS - Cause and cure unknown
People are living longer and better with MS, but finding a cure or even a cause of the disease remains elusive
by WKSU's JEFF ST. CLAIR
This story is part of a special series.


Reporter / Host
Jeff St. Clair
 
Dr. Daniel Ontaneda is a researcher at the Mellen Center at the Cleveland Clinic. He's developing advanced techniques for early detection of MS, and studying the role of Vitamin D in treating the auto-immune disease.
Courtesy of Robert Sustersic
Download (WKSU Only)
In The Region:

Multiple sclerosis affects 20,000 Ohioans, and 400,000 people nationwide.  There is no known cause or cure for MS, but researchers in Northeast Ohio are making progress on both fronts. 

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at the roles of stem-cells and sunshine in our struggles against MS.

Exploradio: MS cause and cure unknown

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (4:57)


(Click image for larger view.)

From untreatable to manageable
The Oak Clinic in Uniontown was designed specifically for people like head nurse Patti Blake.  A bout of multiple sclerosis left her wheelchair bound 30 years ago.  

She recalls the day that her life as a young nursing student suddenly changed, “I went from walking to not walking.  I had a major MS exacerbation, I lost all feeling below the waist, I lost all function below the waist; I went partially blind in one eye.”

Her doctor told her to quit school, go home, get on disability… there was no treatment.  But Blake ignored the doctor’s advice.  She finished school and a decade ago helped found the Oak Clinic, one of a handful of independent charities nationwide dedicated solely to treating MS.

Blake says great strides in treating MS have been made since it struck her three decades ago.  Doctors now have an arsenal of drugs to delay the symptoms and advanced diagnostic techniques to catch it before a crisis hits.

Doctors at the Cleveland Clinic’s Mellen Center detect the first signs of the disease with advanced MRI scanning.  Dr. Daniel Ontaneda points to an MRI scan of a patient’s brain, “this spot here, this is an MS lesion.”

The vitamin D link
MS attacks nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord.  Like stripping the insulation off an electrical wire, in MS, the body’s own defenses strip nerve cells of their protective sheath.  It’s an auto-immune disease that leaves people with everything from numbness to total paralysis. 

The cause remains a mystery, but Ontaneda is studying one important clue. 

“People in northern hemispheres tend to have more MS,  and the higher you go up in latitude, the more and more MS you find.”

He says MS is rare near the equator, but common in Canada.  That’s because sunshine creates vitamin D in your body, and Ontaneda says a vitamin D deficiency is linked to MS. 

But mega-dosing patients with vitamin D has shown mixed results. 

“It remains to be seen if vitamin D has an effect on neuro-degeneration itself, I think it does based on the gray matter data from several cohort studies, but we still have to prove that.”

Stem-cell therapy 
In another part of the Mellen Center, Dr. Jeffrey Cohen is enlisting people’s own healing arsenal to fight MS.  His secret weapon is a rare cell found inside our bones.  Cohen says mesenchymal stem cells comprise half of a percent of the cells inside the bone marrow, the rest are the cells that give rise to the blood cells.  

Cohen and his team developed a technique to harvest these stem cells, and grow them. He then injects them back into the body, and -- like the miniature aquanauts in 1960’s movie “The Fantastic Voyage,” Cohen’s mesenchymal cells find their way to the brain, make repairs, and reduce the inflammation of MS.

He says the theraputic action of the mesenchymal stem-cells seem almost, "too good to be true."  Cohen says they’re probably analogous to a cell that’s been known to pathologists for many years called pericytes that sit outside the blood vessels in the tissues in virtually all parts of the body.

His theory is that mesenchymal stem-cell trigger the pericytes to send out growth factors to heal the damaged nerve cells.  Cohen has tested only 18 people in the first phase of the study, but says the results are encouraging.  

Still, even if it works as well as expected, it could be 5 to 10 years before stem-cell therapy will be widely available.

Patti Blake, at Uniontown’s Oak Clinic, sees the progress made in one of her patients who is part of Cohen’s study.  She says the hope of a cure, and identifying a cause of MS, keeps her going, and new medications and diagnoses make it so that today's MS patients, "don’t have to suffer like we did.”

Every hour, another person in the U.S. is diagnosed with MS.  As the research advocate for the Ohio Chapter of the National MS Society, that’s a clock that Blake would like to see wind down.

Listener Comments:

As a client of the Oak Clinic it very calming and informative place to go for your treatment,and all of the staff are very understanding as well as professional.You learn a lot from all of the staff including doctors and nurses. Thank You!


Posted by: Rhonda (Akron, OH) on September 27, 2012 2:09AM
Great story! Cleveland Clinic is amazing. Stem cell therapy sounds very promising. Autoimmune diseases are quite common, and often result in unnecessary inflammation in the body that can affect nerves, skin and even brain development. Hopefully we will soon learn the triggers for these autoimmune reactions, and how to soothe and ameliorate their effects.


Posted by: Fred Pierre (Stow, OH) on September 11, 2012 2:09AM
Add Your Comment
Name:

Location:

E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


Comments:




 
Page Options

Print this page

E-Mail this page / Send mp3

Share on Facebook



Support for Exploradio
provided by:








Stories with Recent Comments

FitzGerald isn't giving up, but many Stark voters are worried, wary and weary
SB5 stands for "Snow Ball 5" because voters have about a snow ball's chance of remembering what it was.

Columbus groups are trying to pass a Bill of Rights to combat fracking
Its about time we make a stand against the criminal actions of an entire Indsutry.

Crystal Ball says Ohio governor's race is done
How much is the Kasich campaign paying you to keep repeating the phrase "woman who is not his wife"? Fitzgerald was in the car with a friend who happens to be f...

Plane that crashed killing Case students is a popular training aircraft
The following is incorrect. The last few words should read "UNDER maximum gross take-off weight." “They have a normal take-off speed and all those take-off...

Exploradio: The never-ending war against superbugs
Super Federico ,we are so proud of you ,and very lucky to be among your friends . Keep it up human kind needs people like you to survive .Thanks for being so d...

Ohio's Lyme disease-carrying tick population is exploding
Interesting report. The last sentence needs some editing. It isn't a good idea to "save garments carrying ticks for analysis." The garments carrying t...

Teach for America enters third year in Ohio
For more background on TFA, check out http://reconsideringtfa.wordpress.com/

Faith leaders hold week-long prayer vigil at Ohio Statehouse
I think this is the wrong link to the audio. Its Andy Chow about cigarette taxes.

A $30 million plan to turn Cleveland's Public Square from gray to green
The current plan is for the Land Bank, RTA, and Mr. Jeremy Paris to run a bus line through the new Public Square and cutting the park in half. Save Public Squar...

Medina County residents question safety of proposed natural gas pipeline
I'm very concerned about this nexus project. I've received mail requesting my permission to allow the company to survey my property. I don't understand how thi...

Copyright © 2014 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

 
In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University