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Politics




Paul Ryan criticizes Obama's foreign policy during Clermont County visit
Gov. Kasich calls Ryan the Paul Revere of the next generation
Story by ANN THOMPSON
This story is part of a special series.


 
In The Region:

In Clermont County for a rally yesterday (Wed) Vice Presidential nominee Paul Ryan, referencing Libya, criticized the Obama administration's foreign policy. He said the administration's policies project weakness abroad and undercut our allies. Ryan also talked about the debt.

Ryan: Obama didn't make things better

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It’s gone from bad to worse. Look, there’s no two ways about it, President Obama inherited a tough situation. But he didn’t make things better.”

Ryan was introduced by Ohio Governor Kasich. He called Ryan the Paul Revere of the next generation.

Kasich: Ryan as Paul Revere
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(0:20)



“The whole watch word for Paul Ryan is growth and prosperity.  Control our debt, make the programs work better, set the entrepreneurs free, don’t over regulate them, don’t beat them down, and the ingenuity and innovation of the American people will shine forth and America will reclaim its greatness.”

Kasich and Ryan emphasized the importance of Ohio in the presidential race. Earlier in the day Vice President Joe Biden campaigned in Dayton. President Obama is scheduled to come to Cincinnati Monday.

Listener Comments:

"President Obama is scheduled to come to Cincinnati Monday." - That is if he doesn't have an interview with David Letterman scheduled, or supper to eat.
With the Presidential race we'll have to wait til later to learn about his latest vacation or golfing bit; - if only that was all we had to worry about.
--- "set the entrepreneurs free(those nasty corporations), don’t over regulate them(rewarding your special interests), don’t beat them down(required healthscare), and the ingenuity and innovation of the American people will shine forth(they -did- build their businesses) and America will reclaim its greatness.” ---
The Democrat party is controlled by the far left - the Republican party may be Progressive, but they are -not- socialistic big government control freaks.


Posted by: Anonymous on September 15, 2012 10:09AM
"President Obama is scheduled to come to Cincinnati Monday." - if he doesn't have an interview with David Letterman, or have to eat dinner; oh,forgot this is for Obama, not Netanyahu.
-- "Control our debt, make the programs work better,(maybe America should be responsible, and put on our big boy pants, for the sake of future generations) set the entrepreneurs(rich corporations) free, don’t over regulate them(reward special interests), don’t beat them down(healthscare and numerous other unnecessary mandates), and the ingenuity and innovation of the American people will shine forth(they -did- create their businesses, in spite of over-regulation) and America will reclaim its greatness.”
Some Republicans may be Progressive, but they are not socialistic big government control freaks.
Kasich and Ryan are for small government/people make personal decisions.
Ryan knows more about the economy than Obama knows about socialism/totalitarian control.


Posted by: socialists oppose free choice on September 15, 2012 10:09AM
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