Classical Music
Classical Home
Classical Music Playlists
WKSU 3 Classical Channel
Quicklinks

nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

NOCHE

Area Agency on Aging 10B, Inc.


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us

Lipinski Strad
The Lipinski Strad (Michael Darnton)

Police in Milwaukee today (Thursday 6 February) confirmed that a violin recovered from the attic of a house in Milwaukee’s Bay View neighborhood is the rare Lipinski Stradivarius stolen from the Milwaukee Symphony’s concertmaster last Monday (27 January).

Three people were arrested Wednesday, apparently in connection with the theft. One was later released. As of Thursday, no charges had been filed, but that’s expected on Friday.

Concertmaster Frank Almond had been shot with a stun gun. Police say that information from Taser International led them to a Milwaukee resident. On a tip, they also detained a man previously convicted of a 1995 theft from a Milwaukee art gallery.

One of the suspects led police to an acquaintance’s home. There, armed with a search warrant, they found the violin in a suitcase, apparently undamaged. The special custom-made violin case that Almond had used to protect the instrument had earlier been found empty near the scene of his attack.

Almond has scars on his wrist and chest from the stun gun used to assault him, but he’s otherwise physically unharmed.

The recovered Lipinski Strad is back with its anonymous owners. Prior to 2008, when they allowed Almond to use the instrument, they’d kept it in a bank vault. Almond expects to be reunited with the violin this weekend.

In recent years, more rare instruments have become investments for wealthy collectors. This trend is pricing fine historical instruments beyond the means of many working musicians.

However, when collectors lend those instruments to musicians, the instruments grow in reputation and value. Regular use and maintenance also keeps them in better shape than if they were stored away.

Some concern remains that this theft might prompt some collectors to think twice before lending their instruments. Musicians and orchestras also worry about its effect on already-high instrument insurance premiums.

On the other hand, indications are that this was strictly a local job, not a major international heist. That and the speedy recovery are good news for musicians and music lovers.


Further Information:

Milwaukee Police Confirm Recovery at The Guardian

Art Thief Among Suspects at the Milwaukee Star-Tribune

Share This Entry:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • e-mail
  • del.icio.us
  • Tumblr
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon

Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

 

Copyright © 2014 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

 
In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University