KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Election 2018: More Big Name Visitors Expected to Encourage Midterm Voter Turnout

Tuesday, Sept. 25 is National Voter Registration Day . Some groups are working hard to encourage voters to register and cast ballots in the midterm election this November. But midterms are not always a big draw. Professor Dave Cohen, assistant director of the Bliss Institute of Applied Politics at the University of Akron, talks about how this year is shaping up. In the 2014 midterm election 40 percent of registered voters actually cast ballots. Democrats seem more motivated this season after...

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KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Two public school districts say Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine shouldn’t handle the state’s lawsuit seeking to recover millions of dollars from the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow. The districts are asking a Franklin County court if they can take over the lawsuit against the now-closed online charter school.

DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A new state law gives Ohio’s auditor the ability to do audits of the efficiency and operations of state agencies and universities. Ohio State University offered to be first and underwent a performance audit that revealed ways it could save significant dollars. 

Auditor Dave Yost says OSU could save more than $6 million a year if it optimized the use of printers and copiers, changed the way it hires employees and processes payments and moved its computer services. Still that’s small change when you consider the university’s budget is around $7 billion. 

DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Next month, the National Veterans Memorial and Museum will open to the public. But this one of a kind facility isn’t in the nation’s capital. It is in Ohio’s capital city.  

The $82 million, 53,000 square foot project in downtown Columbus is the vision of late astronaut, U.S. Senator and Ohio legend John Glenn. Amy Taylor was involved in the design and fundraising for the new facility. She says it is the only museum of its kind in the country.

photo of Gov. John Kasich
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A recent analysis of state data shows opioid overdose deaths increased by another 20 percent from the previous year. Gov. John Kasich says the opioid crisis is a complex battle, being fought both inside and outside the state.  

Kasich wants to work with law enforcement from other states to help shut down traffickers, increase border protection, and even create security and economic programs for central America.

Aside from clamping the flow of drugs into Ohio, Kasich says people need to comprehend that using fentanyl means instant death.

KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Tuesday, Sept. 25  is National Voter Registration Day. Some groups are working hard to encourage voters to register and cast ballots in the midterm election this November. But midterms are not always a big draw. Professor Dave Cohen, assistant director of the Bliss Institute of Applied Politics at the University of Akron, talks about how this year is shaping up. 

MARK URYCKI / ideastream

The Cleveland Cavaliers start practice for the new season Tuesday, the first time in four years without star LeBron James. 

The Cavs have signed all-star Kevin Love to a new four year contract, and that’s a sign they plan to get to the playoffs again. 

A big trade could still happen but coach Ty Lue says team owner Dan Gilbert is motivated to win, not rebuild from scratch.

Cuyahoga County Drug Court Judge Opposes Issue 1

8 hours ago
NICK CASTELE / ideastream

One of Cuyahoga County’s drug court judges joined Republican gubernatorial candidate Mike DeWine in opposing state Issue 1, which would reduce penalties for drug possession.

 

Judge Joan Synenberg, who presides over one of the county’s two drug dockets, spoke alongside DeWine at a campaign event Monday.

Drug courts put defendants on a plan to receive treatment in exchange for having their case dismissed. Fifty-five counties in Ohio have at least one drug docket.

photo of Greg Milo, Marissa Little, Tina Boyes
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Akron’s Kenmore neighborhood hosted “Boulevard, Bikes + Brews” over the weekend, an event designed to showcase the area’s revitalization, as well as what’s in store for the future.

photo of Scond Chance Village
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Akron City Council has set Thanksgiving as the deadline for the shutdown of Second Chance Village.

Photo of opioids
ShutterShock / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, September 24: 

  • Columbus Dispatch reports Ohio fatal drug overdoses increase;
  • East Cleveland school district files lawsuit against Department of Education;
  • State to distribute $12M through safety grants;
  • Canton City Schools dedicates historical marker in honor of Martin Luther King;

Ohio fatal drug overdoses increase

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From NPR

Some physicians who examined immigrants while working for the federal government had histories of diluting vaccinations, exploiting women and hiring a hit man to kill a dissatisfied patient, according to a scathing report released by the Department of Homeland Security's internal watchdog.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

How Michael Ovitz shifted Hollywood's balance of power

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"Jurassic Park," "Shindler’s List," "Rain Man" and "Ghostbusters" are all movies that might never have been made were it not for a guy named Michael Ovitz. He grew up over the hills from Hollywood in the San Fernando Valley, started working in the entertainment business giving studio tours on Universal's back lot while he was still in high school and eventually became one of the most powerful people in Hollywood. CAA, the talent agency he co-founded and ran for 20 years is still a force in the industry, representing Hollywood A-listers like Meryl Streep, George Clooney and Tom Hanks.

Violent crime stayed essentially flat last year, according to statistics just released by the FBI. Those crimes were down by 0.2 percent last year, after a sharp increase of more than 5 percent the year before.

That means violent crime has essentially plateaued at a level higher than the record lows of a few years ago — but is still substantially lower than the high rates of the 1980s and 1990s.

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